Psychiatric Patients And The Attitude Of Health Workers In Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital

Medical and Health Science Project and Seminar Material

Psychiatric Patients And The Attitude Of Health Workers In Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital


Abstract


The universality of harmful beliefs and subsequent negative attitudes towards the mentally ill is not in doubt (Thara and Srinivasan 2000; Murphy 2002; Botha et al. 2006). This study is set out to identify the persistent socio-cultural factors impeding the acceptability of mentally sick persons in Nigeria, particularly among health care providers in Ogun State. The concept of mental health or illness has a problematic definition because it is largely subjective. Therefore, the study aims to attitude of health workers in federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital.For the purpose of this study, the research design of concern is mainly descriptive in nature employing the field dimension.The emphasis on study population is that it constitute of individuals or elements that are homogeneous in description (Prince Udoyen: 2019). In this study the study population constitute of all the health care workers at Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Aro, Abeokuta.The method of data analysis entails the use of simple ratios and percentage.


Chapter One


Introduction

1.1 Background of the Study

The universality of harmful beliefs and subsequent negative attitudes towards the mentally ill is not in doubt (Thara and Srinivasan 2000; Murphy 2002; Botha et al. 2006). This study is set out to identify the persistent socio-cultural factors impeding the acceptability of mentally sick persons in Nigeria, particularly among health care providers in Ogun State. The concept of mental health or illness has a problematic definition because it is largely subjective. It can only achieve a near uniformity of meaning in the medical arena although a complete state of mental health or well being is almost impossible to attain. The sufferers of mental illness are part of the society but are viewed differently by the society (C.M.H.A. 1993; Murphy 2002; Paterson 2006). Therefore, societal reaction to the mentally sick varies from society to society, as the culture of a people is also a model for human behaviour.

African societies have a peculiar attitude towards the sick or mentally ill persons and this is evident in the rejection, scornful disposition and a negative perception of the sick individual (Sharma 1998; Mohammed et al. 2004; Mohammed and Mohammed 2008). Mental illness is a disorder of one or more of the functions of the mind such as emotion, perception, memory or thoughts, which causes suffering to the person and embarrassment to the family and society. There are a varied number of mental illnesses but the most common and broader classification is psychoses, neuroses and mental retardation. Mental illness could be spurred by environmental or cultural factors and also, by physiological malfunctioning and heredity, these are referred to as functional and organic psychoses respectively.

Allport (1961) posited that an attitude is “mental and neural state of readiness organized through experience, exerting a dynamic influence upon the individual response to all objects or to situations with which it is related”. Similarly (Ewhrudjakpor 1995; Mohammed and Mohammed 2008) defines an attitude as a “learned orientation or disposition, toward an object or situation which provides a tendency to respond favourably or unfavourably to the object or situation”. However strong these attitude definitions are, it was (Zimbardo and Ebbesen 1969) that put it in proper structure when they defined it as “a predisposition, toward any person, ideas or objects, it contains cognitive, affective and behavioural components”.

Thus, individuals disposition becomes an attitude if it contains in some parts, aspects of knowing and acting. Zimbardo and Ebbesen (1969) further assert that, affective component of our attitude consists of a person’s evaluation of liking or emotional response to some objects or person. The cognitive component refers to the way the object or person is perceived. It is in fact the mental picture formed in the individual’s brain. This includes the person’s thoughts, beliefs and knowledge about the object. The behaviour component involves the person’s overt acts directed towards another person or group of persons or objects.

Nigerians make attributions in respect of their attitudes towards sufferers of mental illness. They in most cases do this naively (Ugwuegbu 1994). Attribution theory as postulated by (Heider 1958) states the rules people use to infer the causes of observed behaviour. He divides this process into two: dispositional and situational attribution processes. The dispositional attribution is the process where a person’s actions is attributed to internal dispositions (attitudes, traits, motives). While situational attribution is attributing a person’s actions to factors in the environment such as witchcraft, poverty, beliefs, and so forth.

Although mental health problems are extremely common in our society, there has historically been a negative attitude towards people with mental disorders. A study found that public attitudes towards people with mental illness in England and Scotland became less positive between 1994 and 2003 (Mehta N,et al, 2009). Stigma is thought to stop those with mental health problems seeking appropriate medical help (Jorm AF,2000 ). Stigmatising attitudes towards mental disorders may be influenced by lack of knowledge of psychiatric illness, (Schomerus G, Angelmeyer MC, 2008) and contact with people with mental disorders may lead to more positive attitudes and enlightened views. (Addison SJ, Thorpe SJ, 2004).


1.2 Statement of Problem

Mental illness is a diseased condition, which is deemed undesirable for both the affected individual and the society because it affects adversely the normal functioning of the mental, psychological and emotional make-up of the individual and so it makes the capacity for insight, orientation, judgment, thought, mood and perception blurred (WHO 2001; WPA 2002). The mentally sick in Nigeria culture, most traditional communities ought to look after them since they are still a part of the community and there are possible traditional therapeutic regimens to bring them to a relative state of normality (Jegede 1981; Adebowale and Ogunlesi 1999; Gureje et al. 2005).

However, in Nigeria the situation is now different as mentally ill individuals are socially stigmatized even after they have been cured of this illness (Jegede 2005; Brinn 2000; Binitie 1970). This is in contrast with the communal and closely-knit kinship system in which each person has a responsibility for the well being of the other which dominated African societies (Ayorinde 1983). The mentally sick people constitute nuisance since their consciousness is affected, this is why they need treatment and rehabilitation but the Nigerian situation is quite different as government and the family unit have not done much towards their rehabilitation since many mentally sick persons are not taken care of but allowed to become vagrants.

Also, health workers who should know better seem not to display positive attitude towards such sick people. There is also the problem of cultural factors, which label such people as evil possessed and witchcraft ‘infested’. Most Nigerians believe that mental illness are afflictions caused by supernatural forces (Udoh 2002). Therefore they hold unorthodox beliefs that only traditional and syncretic religious healers can offer more effective and sustainable treatment than orthodox health practitioners.


1.3 Aim and Objectives of the Study

Healthcare professionals have crucial contact with people with mental disorders; hence the aim of this study is to assess the attitudes of health workers towards psychiatric patients. This can further divided into the following objectives:

  1. To access reasons for the negative attitude of healthcare workers towards psychiatric patients.
  2. To determine whether there is adequate healthcare equipment and facility for taking care of the mentally ill.
  3. To determine the impacts of fear on attitude of health workers towards psychiatric patients.
  4. To proffer necessary solutions to the identified problems.

1.4 Research Questions

  1. What are the reasons for the negative attitude of healthcare workers towards psychiatric patients?
  2. Are there adequate healthcare equipment and facility for the taking care of psychiatric patients?
  3. Is there a link between fear and attitude of health workers towards psychiatric patients?
  4. What are the likely solutions to the identified problems?

1.5 Hypotheses

H01: There is no significant relationship between medical knowledge, cultural beliefs and health workers’ attitudes towards the mentally sick.

H02: There is no significant relationship between fear and attitude health workers’ attitudes towards the mentally sick.


1.6 Significance of the Study

This study will provide information on the general attitude of Nigerians particularly health workers towards the mentally sick. Also, it will increase the knowledge of people on mental illness in general and correct all misconceptions about the disease and prompt governments and non-governmental agencies efforts in making more readily available resources for treatment facilities and rehabilitation of mentally ill persons.


1.7 Scope of the Study

For the purpose of this study, we shall only consider the Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Aro, Abeokuta as our area of study. Hence, this study is limited in scope to Abeokuta area of Ogun State as other locations will not be considered.


1.8 Definition of Terms

Attitude:

Manner, disposition, feeling, position, etc., with regard to a person or thing; tendency or orientation, especially of the mind.

Health Workers:

Are people whose job it is to protect and improve the health of their com- munities.


Chapter Five


Discussion and Conclusions

5.1 Discussion

Aggression/destructiveness, talkativeness, and eccentric behaviors were the most frequently mentioned perceived symptoms of mental illness by respondents. This finding suggests that one has to display behaviour that attracts public attention and is therefore socially disruptive, to be recognized as having a mental disorder. This finding is similar to that documented by White in Tanzania and Asuni et al. among Yoruba patients in Western Nigeria. It is notable that hallucinations and delusions that are frequently mentioned in the literature as prototypes of gross psychotic states were not mentioned by the respondents as features of mental illness, probably because such features are not as tangible as aggressive attitudes.

Misuse of drugs ranked highest among the respondents as a perceived cause of mental disorders than most of the other traditional etiologies. This finding may not be unconnected with increasing use of illicit drugs among the youth in developing countries. Although drug abuse was acknowledged by Iliyasu and Last in their work on mental illness in Kano, northern Nigeria as a leading cause of drug dependent psychosis, Holzinger and colleagues reported that drugs and alcohol was not considered by schizophrenia patients or their relatives to be a common cause of mental illness. Divine punishment ranked second as a perceived causative factor. This response may not be unconnected with the leading response (drug misuse), as many individuals are of the belief that one evokes supernatural wrath by taking intoxicants thus leading to the development of mental illness.

Belief in demons as the cause of mental health problems is a well-known phenomenon in many cultures of the world but in our study this factor was ranked 3rd place by respondents (18% of the responses). Our finding is also in contrast to Adebowale and Ogunlesi who found that “supernatural causes” were the most acceptable etiological factor among both mentally ill patients and their relatives in southwest Nigeria.

Only 1.0% of respondents admitted that financial distress or poverty was a possible cause of mental disorder. Such a low score in the face of the present adverse socio-economic conditions prevailing in Nigeria may be explained by the Hausa cultural cum religious belief in providence and patience in the face of adversity. Other factors have also been reported by investigators as being associated with perceived causes of mental illness among patients and their relatives. Srinivasan and Thara found that patient gender and education, duration of illness, the key relative’s education, and the nature of relationship were associated with family beliefs about the cause of mental illness.
There was a higher score on the preference for modern medical care in treating psychiatric illness. Similar changes in attitude towards the modern scientific approach regarding mental disorders was documented by Alem et al in their work on mental illness in Ethiopia and by Iliyasu and Last.

Fear and avoidance of the mentally sick was frequent among female respondents. Traditionally, men are expected to be outwardly brave and less submissive towards aggression. The high frequency of negative attitudes among our respondents may be due to the fact that the concept of the mentally sick has an unfavorable public image. It has been shown that people may evaluate mental illness negatively, reject and discriminate against mental patients, and base their views on traditional stereotypes.

Literacy was found to be significantly associated with positive attitude towards the mentally sick. Similar findings were reported by Madianos et al. in Greece, and by Alem et al.in Ethiopia. A study on community attitudes towards the mentally ill in New Zealand also reported that those who had previous contact with the mentally ill held informed and enlightened views. Interestingly, a recent Hong Kong study reported a generally negative attitude towards the mentally ill despite a fairly good knowledge of mental illness among the respondents. Our results support the hypothesis by Wolff et al. that negative attitudes towards the mentally ill are fueled by a lack of knowledge.


5.2 Conclusions

This study demonstrates the need for educational programs aimed at demystifying mental illness. A better understanding of mental disorders among the public would allay fear and mistrust about mentally ill persons in the community as well as lessen stigmatization towards such persons. Our findings may be of utility to health policy makers in the design of community mental health education programs and community mental health services in existing primary health centers in Nigeria.


Complete Material For Psychiatric Patients And The Attitude Of Health Workers In Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital


Project Material Download

3,000 Naira


The Complete Material will be Sent to You in Just 2 Steps

Quick & Simple…


Step One Purchase

Make a Mobile Transfer or POS Payment of ₦3,000 to any of the Account Below

Access Bank PlcAccount No.: 0811003731
Name: Samphina Academy
Account Type: Current
Zenith BankAccount No.: 1225513212
Name: Samphina Academy
Account Type: Current

Or CLICK HERE To Pay With Debit Card

FOR CLIENTS OUTSIDE NIGERIA
CLICK HERE To Pay With Debit Card ($15)
GHANA – Make Payment of 60 GHS to MTN MoMo, 0553978005, Douglas Osabutey 

Step Two Purchase

Send the Following Details on WhatsApp ( 08143831497) After Payment

  • Payment Details
  • Email Address 
  • Psychiatric Patients And The Attitude Of Health Workers In Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital

The Complete Material Will Be Sent To Your Email Address After Receiving Your Details
T & C Apply


  Contact Our Help Desk


⚠️ Need a different topic? Perform a quick search



Get A Complete Business Plan For Any Business In Nigeria

Business Plan for Businesses in Nigeria

  Business Plans in Nigeria


Disclaimer


This research material “Psychiatric Patients And The Attitude Of Health Workers In Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital” is for research purposes and should be used as a guide in developing your research project / seminar work. For no reason should you copy word for word (verbatim) as samphina.com.ng will not be liable for any who copied the material.

The aim of providing this material is to reduce the stress of moving from one school library to another all in the name of searching for research materials. This service is legal because, all institutions permit their students to read previous projects, books, articles or papers while developing their own works. According to Austin Kleon “All creative work builds on what came before”.

samphina.com.ng is only providing this material “Psychiatric Patients And The Attitude Of Health Workers In Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital” as a reference for your research. The paper should be used as a guide or framework for your own paper. The contents of this paper should be able to help you in generating new ideas and thoughts for your own research. Use it as a guidance purpose only.

Samphina Academy

Samphina Academy is an Online Educational Resource Center that is aimed at providing students with quality information and materials to aid them in succeeding in their academic pursuit.