Patterns And Causes Of Juvenile Delinquency As Expressed By Secondary School Students In Ibarapa Local Government Area, Oyo State

Project and Seminar Material for Education

Patterns And Causes Of Juvenile Delinquency As Expressed By Secondary School Students In Ibarapa Local Government Area, Oyo State


Abstract


The challenges of adolescents are enormous simply because of diverse growth and development that characterized this stage, this lead many adolescents into delinquent behaviours. This study thus investigated the patterns and causes of delinquent behaviours as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area, Oyo State. The study also examined the influence of variables such as gender, age and residential area on respondents’ expressions.

Descriptive survey design was adopted for the study. The using proportional, simple and stratified random sampling techniques were used to draw a sample of 200 secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area, Oyo State. A self-designed instrument entitled “Patterns and Causes of Juvenile Delinquency Questionnaire (PCJDQ)” was used to amass data for the study. The instrument has reliability co-efficient of 0.72 through use of test re-test reliability method. The hypotheses were analyzed with t-test and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) statistics at 0.05 level of significance.

The findings of this study revealed that the major patterns of juvenile delinquency among secondary schools in Ibarapa Local Government Area, are school violence, examination malpractice, bullying of other students, sexual immorality, involvement in graffiti behaviours and using abusive languages in school and public places. The findings also revealed that juvenile delinquency is caused by negative influence of mass media, unmet needs of adolescents, broken home, single parenting and peer pressure. The hypotheses tested revealed no significant difference in the patterns and causes of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area on the bases of gender and age, while significant difference was found based on residential area.

Based on the findings of this study, it is recommended that parents and the society should provide for the needs of adolescents, the school authorities should monitor students’ activities and encourage them on the needs to associate with good peers, teachers should be role models for the students by demonstrating good behaviour to the students, government should regulate the activities of the media making appropriate laws to prevent adolescents’ exposure to delinquent acts, the school counsellors should organise seminars, workshops and symposia on regular basis in order to sensitise adolescents against delinquent behaviours and equip them with necessary social skills.


Table of Contents


  • Title page
  • Certification
  • Dedication
  • Acknowledgements
  • Table of Contents
  • List of Tables
  • Abstract

Chapter One:

Introduction

  • Background to the Study
  • Statement of the Problem
  • Research Questions
  • Research Hypotheses
  • Purpose of the Study
  • Significance of the Study
  • Operational Definition of Terms
  • Scope of the Study

Chapter Two:

Review of the Related Literature

  • Concept of Adolescence
  • Concept of Juvenile Delinquency
  • Theories of Juvenile Delinquency
  • Age and Juvenile Delinquency
  • Patterns of Juvenile Delinquency among Students
  • Causes of Juvenile delinquency among Students
  • Summary of Review of the Related Literature

Chapter Three:

Methodology

  • Preamble
  • Research Design
  • Population, Sample and Sampling Procedure
  • Instrumentation
  • Procedure for Data Collection
  • Procedure for Scoring the Instrument
  • Method of Data Analysis

Chapter Four:

Results

  • Preamble
  • Demographic Data
  • Hypotheses Testing
  • Summary of Findings

Chapter Five:

Discussion, Conclusion and Recommendations

  • Preamble
  • Discussion of Findings
  • Conclusion
  • Recommendations
  • Suggestions for Further Studies
  • References
  • Appendix

List of Tables


  • Demographic characteristics of respondents
  • Mean and rank order of patterns of juvenile delinquency among students
  • Mean and rank order of causes of juvenile delinquency
  • Mean, SD and t-test results comparing respondents’ expression on patterns of juvenile delinquency based on gender
  • Mean, SD and t-test results comparing respondents’ expression on causes of juvenile delinquency based on gender
  • ANOVA result comparing respondents’ expression on patterns of juvenile delinquency based on age
  • ANOVA result comparing respondents’ expression on causes of juvenile delinquency based on age
  • Mean, SD and t-test results comparing respondents’ expression on patterns of juvenile delinquency based on residential area
  • Mean, SD and t-test results comparing respondents’ expression on causes of juvenile delinquency based on residential area

Chapter One


Introduction

Background to the Study

Adolescence is a developmental transition between childhood and adulthood. It is the period of puberty until full adult status is attained. Dorn and Biro (2011) defined adolescence as the period in human growth and development that occurs after childhood and before adulthood, from ages 10 to 19. It represents one of the critical transitions in the life span and is characterized by a tremendous pace in growth and change that is second only to that of infancy. The biological determinants of adolescences are fairly universal; however, the duration and defining characteristics of this period may vary across time, cultures, and socio-economic situations (Dorn & Biro, 2011).

Most secondary schools students are in the adolescent stage. The adolescent has needs and problems that arise from organic, psychological and social pressures. These pressures in turn exert influences on them, which make them exhibit behaviours that are not in consonance with societal norms leading to delinquency (Onyejiaku, 1991). According to Isangedighi (2008), delinquency is a behaviour that involves retraction from rules that govern behaviour among adolescents. Delinquency on the whole is not an easy concept to define due to it complex characteristics. However, delinquency has been from time immemorial a social evil. These delinquent behaviours consist of acts that violate the laws of the society.

Delinquency has been variously portrayed and defined as a condition of drift, maladjustment, pathology, disturbance, moral depravity and unruly behaviour (Alemika ,et al 2001). Alemika further contributed that the definition of juvenile delinquency as well as concern about its manifestation, and control are influenced by a configuration of historical, political, social and economic conditions. Therefore, juvenile delinquency is broadly defined to any act in violation of criminal law, committed by a person defined under law as a juvenile, which if had been committed by an adult will be treated as crime or criminal conduct (Muncie, 1999). Alemika et al (2001) define Juvenile as the violation of the criminal codes regulating the behavior of young persons in the society. Juvenile crime is usually termed delinquency (Jayamala 2008). In addition, Onyehalu (2003) argues that any departure from the accepted norms by people who are not yet adult is delinquency. However, Bingham; Shope, and Raghunathan (2006) refer to such behaviours which are socially proscribed or prohibited as problem behaviours.

Any behaviour that falls short of societal norms, values, beliefs and expectations are undesirable behaviours (Okorodudu & Okorodudu 2003). Juvenile delinquency is noted by Ekojo and Adole (2008) as gang delinquency. Okorodudu (2010) further defines gangs delinquent as a group of adolescents and youths that exhibit criminal behaviour. Deliquent behaviour could exist in different forms or patterns. Patterns of delinquent behaviours refer to forms or practices in which adolescents’ delinquency exists. It means different ways by which delinquent behaviour manifest in the dealings and activities of adolescents. For example, Sanni, Nsisong, Abayomi , Modo and Leonard (2010) associated adolescents’ delinquent behaviours to vandalism, drug abuse, weapon carrying, alcohol abuse, rape, examination malpractices, school violence, and bullying, cultism, truancy and school drop-outs and so on. Onyejiaku (1991) stressed that delinquency covers an enormous rage on crime including felonies such as robbery, assault or misdemeanors such as loitering and behaviours that are illegal.

Eke (2004) categories delinquent behaviours into two, that which frequently feature across towns and cities in Nigeria. These are Criminal and Status offences. The criminal offences include stealing, arson, rape, drug offences and murder, burglary, pick pocket, and armed robbery. However, she listed status offences to include; running away from home, malingering and truancy. On the global scale, Armando (1989) classified youth gangs or delinquency into four types: criminal, conflict, retreatist, and cult/occult gangs.

Criminal gangs have a primary goal, that is, material gain through criminal activities such as theft of property from people or premises, extortion, fencing, and drug trafficking. Conflict Gangs engage in violent conflict with individuals of rival groups that invade their neighbourhood or commit acts that they consider degrading or insulting. Retreatist gangs focus on getting “high” or “leaded” alcohol, cocaine, marijuana, heroin or other drugs. Individuals tend to join this type of gang to secure continued access to drugs. Cult/Occult Gangs engage in devil or evil worship cult which refers to systematic worshipping of evil or the devil; occult implies keeping something secret or hidden or a belief in supernatural or mysterious powers.

Similarities in the basic characteristics of juvenile group behaviour are found in almost every class and cultural context. Juvenile peer groups are noted for their high levels of social cohesiveness, hierarchical organization, and a certain code of behaviour based on the rejection of adult values and experience. The subcultural aspect of juvenile group activities is rarely given the attention it deserves (The World Youth Report, 2003). Different juvenile groups adopt what amounts to a heterogeneous mix, or synthesis, of predominant (class-based) values, which are spread by the entertainment industry, and intergenerational (group-based) values, which are native to the family or neighbourhood. Subcultures can be defined as particular lifestyle systems that are developed in groups and are in structurally subordinate positions as a result of pressure exerted by the predominant systems (The World Youth Report, 2003).

Some of the reasons or causes of adolescents’ juvenile delinquency as identified by Eke (2004) and Okorodudu (2010) unmet needs of youths by the family, neighbourhood or traditional community institutions (such as the schools, police, recreational and religious institutions) and government. Factors, in the home environments, like poverty, ill-treatment, alcoholic parents, broken family life, may drive the juvenile to the streets to commit delinquencies. Family attitudes, like overprotection, rejection, lack of love, lack of response from parents, lack of suitable ideal and lack of discipline may also drive a child to criminal activities (Jayamala, 2008). Researches indicate that the family environment is an important variable in the development of delinquency.

Gorman-Smith, and Tolan (1998) discovered that parental conflicts and parental aggressiveness predicted involvement in property crime. Wright and Wright (1995) study shows that single-parent families produce more delinquent children than two-parent families. Many researchers agree that the foundation of adolescent delinquency is rooted in the kind of home the adolescent is brought up (Utti, 1996; Odebunmi, 2007; Otuadah, 2008). The basis for good behaviour orientation and good adolescents’ attitude development is founded on positive parenting. Okpako (2004) stated that the parents should be blamed and be made to take responsibility for the misfortunes that befall the adolescents.

Obinyan (2004) opined that the two oldest most widely accepted conclusions in criminology are first, that involvement in crime diminishes with age and second, that males are more likely than females to offend at every age. Youngsters between the ages of 8 and 14 begin to confide less in parents and more in peers and to be more influenced by those peers for assistance in making decisions about what behaviour to adopt (Paikoff & Brooks-Gun, 1991). There is a huge variation in age factor of adolescent from one society to another. Arrests data show that the intensity of criminal behaviour slackens after the teens and it continues to decline with age. Much research indicate that males are more likely to participate in crime compared to females (Chisney-Lind, 1997; Snyder & Sickmund, 2006) and that individual offending rates tend to peak in late adolescence then drop off in early adulthood (Blumstein & National Research Council 1986).

Juvenile delinquency is a complex problem that exacts a substantial and continuing toll on the society (Mulvey, 1997). Brown (1998) opined that juvenile delinquency is one of the many serious social problems some children confront on a regular basis and that there physical, psychological and financial cost to society. The consequences of delinquency will forever change the lives of the offenders and their victims. Brown (1998) posited that the concern about juvenile crime is widely shared by the federal, state and local government officials and by the public. Hence, radical steps have to be taken in order to curb this problem.

The manifestation of delinquency among secondary school students has remained an age long problem in the Nigerian secondary school system. In a study carried out by Ajake, Etuk and Omori (2010), it was shown that there is a high rate of school complains about student’s delinquency. The extent to which parents and other adults in the family make provision for the holistic growth of their adolescent, with the view of curbing societal ills has generated a lot of concern in the contemporary Nigeria as a whole. Increased attention is being given to the ability of individual and family to successfully remedy the negative impact of delinquency. It is against this background that this study deems it fit to investigate the patterns and causes of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area, Oyo State.


Statement of the Problem

In the past four decades and so there has been increasing concern about the behaviours that children exhibit in schools (particularly in the middle and high schools). The school authority has blamed adolescent students for increased disorder and crime without acknowledgement of the multiple risk factors that may have cause juvenile delinquency. Increase in juvenile delinquency, high rate of early school dropouts in both girls and boys, increase in the numbers of street children and high rate of crime, continue to elicit concerns in the community.

The threat of indigent on streets across the cities in Nigeria is a social problem to the general public and the government (Okorodudu, 2010) as delinquent activities are assuming dangerous tendencies which threaten life, property, individuals’ well-being, peace, security, social order and are eventually, reducing the citizens’ quality of life. For example, adolescents engagement in inter-school fight recently in Ibadan, a city in one of the South-Western States in Nigeria could have passed for a mere inter-school rivalry, but for the use of dangerous weapons such as knives, cutlasses and charms; it was reported that severe injuries were sustained not only by the fighting students but by passers-by in that neighbourhood (Aremu, 2012).

Studies have been conducted on juvenile delinquency, for instance, Hoeve, Dubas, Eichelsheim, Laan, and Jan (2009) carried out a meta-analysis study on the relationship between parenting and delinquency. The study found strong link among parental monitoring, psychological control and negative aspects of support such as rejection and hostility, accounting for up to eleven percent of the variance in delinquency. Ekpo and Ajake (2013) studied family socio-economic status and delinquency among senior secondary school students in Calabar South, Cross River State. The study found that family socio-economic status and the educational level of parents significantly influences student’s delinquency. Also, delinquent behaviour observed among students is traceable to the fact that most parents are poor.

These previous studies did not focused on patterns and causes of juvenile delinquency. This is the gap the researcher intends to fill by investigating the patterns and causes of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area, Oyo State.


Research Questions

The following research questions are raised to guide the conduct of the study:

  1. What are the patterns of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area?
  2. What are the causes of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area?
  3. Is there any difference in the patterns of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area on the basis of gender?
  4. Is there any difference in the causes of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area on the basis of gender?
  5. Is there any difference in the patterns of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area on the basis of age?
  6. Is there any difference in the causes of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area on the basis of age?
  7. Is there any difference in the patterns of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area on the basis of residential area?
  8. Is there any difference in the causes of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area on the basis of residential area?

Research Hypotheses

Based on the research questions, the following research hypotheses are formulated:

  1. There is no significant difference in the patterns of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area on the basis of gender.
  2. There is no significant difference in the causes of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area on the basis of gender.
  3. There is no significant difference in the patterns of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area on the basis of age.
  4. There is no significant difference in the causes of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area on the basis of age.
  5. There is no significant difference in the patterns of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area on the basis of residential area.
  6. There is no significant difference in the causes of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area on the basis of residential area.

Purpose of the Study

The main purpose of this study was to investigate patterns and causes of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area, Oyo State. The study also examined the influence of variables such as gender, age and residential area on the patterns and causes of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area, Oyo State.


Significance of the Study

The findings of this study would be of immense benefits to the students, school authorities, parents, school counsellors and counsellors under training.

The findings of this study would be of great benefit to secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area by becoming aware of the patterns and causes of juvenile delinquency behaviours among their co-students and its consequences on them, their family and the society at large so that they may abstain from any causes of delinquent behaviour. The findings would also help students to realize their potentials and thereby enable them to contribute to the development of the country through their productivity and hence become good citizen.

The findings of this study would help the school administrators, non-teaching and teaching staff saddled with the responsibility of understanding the patterns and causes that are responsible for juvenile delinquency behaviours and also equipped them with strategies to treat students with the problem of juvenile delinquency. For instance, this study aims at revealing the psychological conceptions of those considered juveniles and help provide insight into their way of life. This in turn could offer the teachers a better means of understanding students and may also assist in putting up programs that will help to treat with juvenile students instead of casting them out.

The result of juvenile delinquency behaviours in school may be used by parents and members of the society in coming up with measures that can be employed to prevent delinquent behaviours and ensure that their children refrain from any acts of delinquent behaviour.

The finding of this study would provide professional counsellors with the understanding of the factors responsible for the causes of juvenile delinquency behaviour and creating suitable counselling strategies that will help them in dealing with the problem of delinquent behaviour in schools.

The counsellors under training would also benefit from the findings of this study as the knowledge of delinquent behaviour is rarely provided during undergraduate training.


Operational Definition of Terms

The following terms are operationally defined as used in the study:

Adolescence:

Refers to the transitory period where an adolescent is experiencing spurt growth and development. The adolescent years fall within 10-21 years.

Causes of Juvenile Delinquency:

Factors motivating adolescents towards engaging in anti-social behaviours.

Juvenile Delinquency:

It refers behaviours committed by an adolescents which deviates from societal acceptance and punishable by law.

Juvenile:

Adolescents within the age bracket 10-21 years old.

Delinquency:

It refers behaviours that deviates from societal acceptance and punishable by law.

Patterns of Juvenile Delinquency:

Different types of anti-social behaviours perpetrating by secondary school. These include; stealing, rape, drug offences, murder, to mention but a few.

Secondary School Students:

Adolescents within the age range of 10-21 in both junior and senior classes.


Scope of the Study

The study is limited to patterns and causes of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area, Oyo State. Multi stage sampling technique was used to select 200 respondents from secondary schools in Ibarapa Local Government Area. Questionnaire titled “Patterns and Causes of Juvenile Delinquency Questionnaire” (PCJDQ) was used to gather data for the study. Frequency counts and percentages were used to analyze the demographic data section, while t-test and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) were used to compare the mean of two or more different groups according to the study.


Chapter Five


Discussion, Conclusion and Recommendations

Preamble

This study investigated the patterns and causes of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area, Oyo State. The study examined the influence of demographic variables of gender, age and residence area on respondents’ views. Six null hypotheses postulated for this study were tested at 0.05 alpha level using t-test and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) statistics. This chapter thus presents the discussion of findings, conclusion and recommendations based on the findings of the study.


Discussion

The findings of this study revealed that the major patterns of juvenile delinquency among secondary schools in Ibarapa Local Government Area area are school violence, examination malpractice, bullying of other students, sexual immorality, involvement in graffiti behaviour and using abusive language in school and public places. The findings depict conventional behaviour adolescents usually engage in. These are behaviours that are commonly found among adolescents. The findings of this study is similar with the finding of Sanni, Nsisong, Abayomi, Modo and Leonard (2010) which associated adolescents’ delinquent behaviours to violence, rape, examination malpractices, and bullying among others. Eke (2004) also include sexual immorality, graffiti behaviour and using abusive language in the host of delinquent behaviours among adolecsents.

The findings also revealed that juvenile delinquency among secondary schools in Ibarapa LGA area is caused by negative influence of mass media, unmet needs of adolescents, broken home, single parenting and peer pressure. This finding corroborates the findings of Okorodudu (2010) which noted that unmet needs of youths by the family, neighbourhood or traditional community institutions and government are the major causes of delinquency among adolescents. Studies have indicated that the family environment is an important variable in the development of delinquency. Wright and Wright (1995) study revealed that single-parent families produce more delinquent children than two-parent families. Many researchers agree that the foundation of adolescent delinquency is rooted in the kind of home the adolescent is brought up (Utti, 1996; Odebunmi, 2007; Otuadah, 2008). In view of this, Okpako (2004) opined that the parents should be blamed and be made to take responsibility for the misfortunes that befall the adolescents.

Violence depicted in the media is unreal and has a surrealistic quality; wounds bleed less, and the real pain and agony resulting from violent actions are very rarely shown, so the consequences of violent behaviour often seem negligible (Bartol & Bartol, 2009). The American Psychological Association has reviewed the evidence and has concluded that television violence accounts for about 10 per cent of aggressive behaviour among children (American Psychological Association, 1993).

Peer pressure influence is a very powerful motivator in a student life. Studies such as (Dishion, Andrews & Crosby, 1999; Dishion & Medici-Skaggs, 2000) have found that Gangs, peer groups vary in their overall rates of deviance, but if one member of a group engages in problem behaviour, a high probability exists that other members will do the same. It was also reported that adolescents’ exposure to delinquent peers is linked to increases in a wide range of delinquent behaviours like drug use, covert antisocial behaviour, violent offenses, early and high-risk sexual behaviour.

The first hypothesis revealed that there is no significant difference in the patterns of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area on the basis of gender. This implies that male and female respondents’ are no different in their expression on patterns of juvenile delinquency. This might be because they are all adolescents and are bound to experience same developmental influence that may lead them to delinquent behaviours. The findings of this study is relevant with the finding of Abrifor, Oludele and Soetan (2015) where gender was found to have no significant difference in the patterns of youth criminality based on age.

The second hypothesis showed no significant difference in the causes of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area on the basis of gender. This means that male and female secondary school students’ expression is not different on the causes of juvenile delinquency. The implication of this is that both male and female would have been susceptible and experienced to factors that might lead one into delinquency. This finding supports the view of Snyder and Sickmund (2006) that males are more likely to participate in delinquency compared to females.

Hypothesis three revealed no significant difference in the patterns of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area on the basis of age. This means that age has no influence on the expression of the respondents on patterns of juvenile delinquencies. This finding negates the finding of Animasahun and Aremu (2015) who found that age influence adolescents involvement in delinquent behaviours. This may due to the fact that as an individual is growing into maturity, he/she tends to inculcate or put-on adult behaviour to signify movement from adolescence to adulthood.

Hypothesis four indicated that there is no significant difference in the causes of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area on the basis of age. This implies that age has no influence in the expression of adolescents on the causes of juvenile delinquency. This finding is similar to the finding of Abrifor, Oludele and Soetan (2015) where age was found to have no significant difference in the patterns of youth criminality based on age. This might suggest that similar factors could lead adolescents to juvenile delinquency regardless of their stage of adolescence, that is, whether early, middle or late adolescence.

The fifth hypothesis revealed that there is significant difference in the patterns of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area on the basis of residential area. The meaning of this is that place of residence of the respondents has influence on the patterns of juvenile delinquencies they engage in. This finding corroborates the finding of Afon and Badiora (2013) whose study revealed significant influence of residence on adolescents’ misconduct behaviours. This might be because adolescents in the urban centers are more prone to influence of the media and dignitaries with respect to high technological advancement in the modern world compared to their rural counterparts.

The hypothesis sixth also revealed significant difference in the causes of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area on the basis of residential area. This means that residential area of respondents influence their expression on causes of juvenile delinquency. The finding of this study is in line with that of Alapata (2003) found significant difference in adolescents’ delinquencies based on area of residence. The justification given for this is that urban cities are full of violence that might motivate urban adolescents into delinquencies than their rural colleagues.


Conclusion

The findings of this study revealed that the major patterns of juvenile delinquency among secondary schools in Ibarapa LGA area are school violence, examination malpractice, bullying of other students, sexual immorality, involvement in graffiti behaviour and using abusive language in school and public places. The findings also revealed that juvenile delinquency among secondary schools in Ibarapa LGA area is caused by negative influence of mass media, unmet needs of adolescents, broken home, single parenting and peer pressure.

The hypotheses tested revealed no significant difference in the patterns and causes of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa Local Government Area on the basis of gender and age, while significant difference was found based on residential area.


Recommendations

The following recommendations were made based on the findings of the study:

  1. Parents and the society should provide for the needs of adolescents (most especially the basic needs) so that they can be prevented from engaging in delinquent behaviours that may negatively influence their future.
  2. The school authorities should monitor students’ activities and encourage them on the needs to associate with peers that help them improve in their academic pursuits and moral standard.
  3. Teachers should be role models for the students by demonstrating in their daily interactions the required behaviour they are expected from the students so that they can abstain from all sorts of delinquencies that may destroy their live.
  4. The constituted authorities in the media industry should as a matter of urgency regulate the activities of the media by putting appropriate policies and laws in place and ensure its full implementation so that adolescents exposure to delinquencies could be reduced if not totally prevented.
  5. The school counsellors should educate students on the danger of delinquency and show them the positive outcome of abstaining from it. In view of this, counsellors should organise seminars, workshops and symposia on regular basis in order to sensitise them against delinquent behaviours and equip them with necessary social skills that could assist them escape from environmental influences to delinquencies.

Suggestions for Further Studies

This study investigated the patterns and causes of juvenile delinquency as expressed by secondary school students in Ibarapa LGA, Oyo State. In other to extend the scope of this study, it is suggested that further researchers should replicate it in other states or cover a specific geo-political zones in Nigeria. This invariably will increase the sample size of the study, will ensure a fair coverage of large samples and will improve generalizability of findings of the study. Similarly, variables of religion and family type could also be examined on respondents’ views.


Patterns And Causes Of Juvenile Delinquency As Expressed By Secondary School Students In Ibarapa Local Government Area, Oyo State


Project Material Download

3,000 Naira


The complete material will be sent to you in just 2 steps.

Quick & Simple…


Step One Purchase

Make payment of ₦3,000: through USSD Transfer, Bank Mobile App, ATM Transfer, or POS Transfer to:

Access Bank PlcAccount No.: 0811003731
Name: Samphina Academy
Account Type: Current

Or Click Here to pay with Debit Card

FOR CLIENTS OUTSIDE NIGERIA:
Click Here to pay with Debit Card ($15)
GHANA – Make Payment of 60 GHS to MTN MoMo, 0553978005, Douglas Osabutey 

  PAY WITH CRYPTOCURRENCY


Step Two Purchase

Send the following details through Text Message or WhatsApp Messenger | +234-8143831497

  • Payment Details 
  • Email Address 
  • Patterns And Causes Of Juvenile Delinquency As Expressed By Secondary School Students In Ibarapa Local Government Area, Oyo State

The complete material will be sent to your email address after receiving your payment information | T & C Apply


  Contact Our Help Desk


You may also like:

⚠️ Need a different topic? Perform a quick search



Get A Complete Business Plan For Any Business In Nigeria

Business Plan for Businesses in Nigeria

  Business Plans in Nigeria


Patterns And Causes Of Juvenile Delinquency As Expressed By Secondary School Students In Ibarapa Local Government Area, Oyo State


Disclaimer

This research material “Patterns And Causes Of Juvenile Delinquency As Expressed By Secondary School Students In Ibarapa Local Government Area, Oyo State” is for research purposes and should be used as a guide in developing your research project / seminar work. For no reason should you copy word for word (verbatim) as samphina.com.ng will not be liable for any who copied the material.

The aim of providing this material is to reduce the stress of moving from one school library to another all in the name of searching for research materials. This service is legal because, all institutions permit their students to read previous projects, books, articles or papers while developing their own works. According to Austin Kleon “All creative work builds on what came before”.

samphina.com.ng is only providing this material “Patterns And Causes Of Juvenile Delinquency As Expressed By Secondary School Students In Ibarapa Local Government Area, Oyo State” as a reference for your research. The paper should be used as a guide or framework for your own paper. The contents of this paper should be able to help you in generating new ideas and thoughts for your own research. Use it as a guidance purpose only.


How to defend your research work


This is a general guide on how to defend your research work:

1. Prepare For Questions:

If you are preparing for questions that may be asked during your defense, then your answers will flow smoothly and effectively. This will prove your knowledge on the subject e.g “Patterns And Causes Of Juvenile Delinquency As Expressed By Secondary School Students In Ibarapa Local Government Area, Oyo State“, and strengthening your argument. Ask friends and family, read your work for them to listen to your presentation, and write down questions. You may be lucky the panel will ask you those you have already prepared on.

2. Strong Summary:

Summarizing your chapters will help keep your audience focused because it is easy for a mind to drift, so providing summaries will ensure your panel will follow along, even if they lose focus for a brief moment. Visual aides, such as graphs and power-point presentations can be very helpful. If you are going to use these, make sure you will practice your presentation with them.

3. Be Confident in Your Research Work:

Not knowing your topic “Patterns And Causes Of Juvenile Delinquency As Expressed By Secondary School Students In Ibarapa Local Government Area, Oyo State” inside out will cause you to struggle and ultimately fail with your defense. You need to know the subject from every angle to ensure you are fully prepared for any question that may come your way.

4. Conclusion:

Reinforce your findings to conclude your defense. The finale of your presentation should focus on proving the work that has been done. You may need to recap on what has changed and remained unchanged, if is necessary.

5 . Listen:

Before you get defensive or recite a particular answer, make sure you truly understand the question being asked. Being a good listener is an important quality, because providing an inaccurate or off-topic answer will also weaken the validity of your paper.

Samphina Academy

Samphina Academy is an Online Educational Resource Center that is aimed at providing students with quality information and materials to aid them in succeeding in their academic pursuit.