Evaluation Of The Junior Secondary School’s Predictive Value In Relation To The Senior Secondary School’s Examination Performance

Project and Seminar Material for Education

Evaluation Of The Junior Secondary School’s Predictive Value In Relation To The Senior Secondary School’s Examination Performance


Chapter One


Introduction

1.1 Background of the Study

The researcher’s goal in this study is to see if the outcomes of the junior secondary school certificate examinations in Nigeria can be used to predict students’ success in the senior secondary school certificate examinations. The researcher’s motivation for suggesting such a study stemmed from the fact that it is general information that SSCE performance has been low for a long time (WAEC 1994 and 1995), despite the fact that these students had acceptable grades in JSCE and were consistently admitted to SSI. This calls into question the JSCE’s validity (Popham, 2002) as a suitable benchmark for determining a student’s ability to cope efficiently with SSS work. However, information on a student’s skills and preparedness for work and further studies in the next level of school is necessary at any point in their education. This information is often derived through a review of students’ academic achievement in various courses as evidenced by their examination results (Al-Shorayye, 1995). This allows for accurate decision-making, such as student certification and placement, as well as the prediction of their future performance at a higher level. As a result, academic performance has been defined as a student’s current academic status. It describes how a person can exhibit his or her intellectual ability. This academic status can be described by the grades earned in a course or a series of courses. Schouten (1970) emphasized the use of grades in tests in predicting academic success and indicated that grades might serve as both prediction and criteria measures. They believed that based on the outcomes of a prior examination, a credible forecast of a future examination result could be established. Adeyemi’s (1998) findings backed up this assertion. Other researches had shown that the outcomes of the General Certificate Examination (GCE) and Secondary School Certificate Examination (SSCE) were the greatest predictors of university achievement. The validity of the number and grades of passes in the Scottish Certificate of Education in predicting first-year and final-year university success was validated by Peers and Johnston (1994). According to Gay (1996), high school grades may be used to predict college grades. Klomegah (2007) conducted study to see how well index scores of students’ self-efficacy, self-set objectives, assigned goals, and ability might predict university students’ performance and which index score was the strongest predictor of academic achievement. Self-efficacy had the highest predictive value, and high school GPA was a stronger predictor of students’ academic achievement than the goal-efficacy model, according to the findings of a study conducted in North Carolina, United States of America. Adeyemi (2006) discovered that success in junior secondary school certificate examinations was a good predictor of performance in senior secondary school certificate examinations in Ondo State, Nigeria. Historically, the introduction of the 6-3-3-4 educational system in Nigeria in 1982 was accompanied by the use of internal and external student evaluations that were integrated for certification and prediction of future performance. The 6-3-3-4 system’s first stage specifies a child’s first three years of schooling following a six-year primary school education. The Junior Secondary School (JSS) level of education is the first three years of a child’s education, whereas the Senior Secondary School (SSS) level is the last three years (Daniels, 1970). Continuous evaluation and the final test for the junior secondary school level are combined for the certification of the JSS level in order to get the JSS certificate. The student’s secondary education is completed in the last three years, at the Senior Secondary School level. The student’s ongoing evaluation and final examination are also included in the senior secondary school certificate, which is administered by either the “National Examination Council” (NECO) or the “West African Examination Council” (WAEC). However, Nigerian researchers have come to differing conclusions about the predictive value of several tests. In other developing countries, academic performance indices differed from one country to the next. Kishor (1994) discovered a moderate positive linear association between Kenya Certificate of Primary Education scores and Certificate of Secondary Education grades. Performance in the JSCE has been found to be highly connected to performance in the SSCE in various other states. However, other researches have shown no link between JSC exam performance and SSC exam performance (Othuon 1997). Against the contradictory views and findings of previous researchers on the predictive validity of the JSC examinations, the purpose of this study was to examine student performance in JSC examinations to see if it could accurately predict students’ performance in SSCE examinations in Nigeria, with a focus on a few selected junior and senior secondary schools in the Ivo Local Government Area of Ebonyi.


1.2 Statement of the Problem

In Nigeria, the performance of secondary school students has been a source of contention. Some schools of thought believed that the situation was improving (Adewolu, 1998). Other schools of thought claimed that the level of performance was rapidly diminishing (Onipede, 2003). The goal of this study was to see if there were any significant disparities in performance levels between secondary school students in Nigeria’s junior and senior secondary certificate examinations.


1.3 Objectives of Study

The overall goal of this study was to determine the predictive value of junior secondary school performance in relation to senior secondary school test results. The following are the specific goals that this study aims to achieve:

  1. Determine whether there is a substantial association between students’ total JSCE performance and their SSCE performance.
  2. To see if students’ total performance in junior secondary school is a good predictor of their future achievement in senior secondary school exams.
  3. To find out the nature and strength of the link between chosen JSCE subjects and their SSCE results..

1.4 Research Questions

  1. What us the substantial association between students’ total JSCE performance and their SSCE performance?
  2. Is the total performance of students in junior secondary school is a good predictor of their future achievement in senior secondary school exams?
  3. What is the the link between chosen JSCE subjects and their SSCE results..

1.5 Significance of the Study

This study is crucial because it will assist establish a correlation between JSCE performance and total SSCE performance, demonstrating the extent to which the former can impact the latter among Nigerian students. Apart from that, a study like this would serve as a reference book for students, academics, and researchers in identifying many elements that may lead pupils to fail their exams. Furthermore, the findings of this study will serve as a clear reference for the Nigerian government, policymakers, Ministry of Education, curriculum designers, and evaluation studies in determining which policy areas (in terms of student performance) demand immediate revision. This research endeavor is also justified on the grounds that it will serve as a knowledge frontier for future academics interested in doing similar research.


1.6 Scope of the Study

This research project will not go beyond examining students’ performance in the JSCE and their matching performance in the SSCE. However, because to the high number of schools in Lagos State, the researcher limited his focus to twelve (12) selected junior and senior public secondary schools in Ebonyi State’s Uvo Local Government.


1.7 Definition of Terms

Knowledge:

Facts, information, and abilities gained via experience or study; theoretical or practical knowledge about a subject.

Evaluation:

Making a decision on the quantity, number, or worth of anything is called evaluation.

Performance:

The act of delivering a play, concert, or other type of entertainment is known as a performance.

School:

School is a place where students are educated.


Evaluation Of The Junior Secondary School’s Predictive Value In Relation To The Senior Secondary School’s Examination Performance


Project Material Download

3,000 Naira


The complete material will be sent to you in just 2 steps.

Quick & Simple…


Step One Purchase

Make payment of ₦3,000: through USSD Transfer, Bank Mobile App, ATM Transfer, or POS Transfer to:

Access Bank PlcAccount No.: 0811003731
Name: Samphina Academy
Account Type: Current

Or Click Here to pay with Debit Card

FOR CLIENTS OUTSIDE NIGERIA:
Click Here to pay with Debit Card ($15)
GHANA – Make Payment of 60 GHS to MTN MoMo, 0553978005, Douglas Osabutey 

  PAY WITH CRYPTOCURRENCY


Step Two Purchase

Send the following details through Text Message or WhatsApp Messenger | +234-8143831497

  • Payment Details 
  • Email Address 
  • Evaluation Of The Junior Secondary School’s Predictive Value In Relation To The Senior Secondary School’s Examination Performance

The complete material will be sent to your email address after receiving your payment information | T & C Apply


  Contact Our Help Desk


You may also like:

⚠️ Need a different topic? Perform a quick search



Get A Complete Business Plan For Any Business In Nigeria

Business Plan for Businesses in Nigeria

  Business Plans in Nigeria


Evaluation Of The Junior Secondary School’s Predictive Value In Relation To The Senior Secondary School’s Examination Performance


Disclaimer

This research material “Evaluation Of The Junior Secondary School’s Predictive Value In Relation To The Senior Secondary School’s Examination Performance” is for research purposes and should be used as a guide in developing your research project / seminar work. For no reason should you copy word for word (verbatim) as samphina.com.ng will not be liable for any who copied the material.

The aim of providing this material is to reduce the stress of moving from one school library to another all in the name of searching for research materials. This service is legal because, all institutions permit their students to read previous projects, books, articles or papers while developing their own works. According to Austin Kleon “All creative work builds on what came before”.

samphina.com.ng is only providing this material “Evaluation Of The Junior Secondary School’s Predictive Value In Relation To The Senior Secondary School’s Examination Performance” as a reference for your research. The paper should be used as a guide or framework for your own paper. The contents of this paper should be able to help you in generating new ideas and thoughts for your own research. Use it as a guidance purpose only.


How to defend your research work


This is a general guide on how to defend your research work:

1. Prepare For Questions:

If you are preparing for questions that may be asked during your defense, then your answers will flow smoothly and effectively. This will prove your knowledge on the subject e.g “Evaluation Of The Junior Secondary School’s Predictive Value In Relation To The Senior Secondary School’s Examination Performance“, and strengthening your argument. Ask friends and family, read your work for them to listen to your presentation, and write down questions. You may be lucky the panel will ask you those you have already prepared on.

2. Strong Summary:

Summarizing your chapters will help keep your audience focused because it is easy for a mind to drift, so providing summaries will ensure your panel will follow along, even if they lose focus for a brief moment. Visual aides, such as graphs and power-point presentations can be very helpful. If you are going to use these, make sure you will practice your presentation with them.

3. Be Confident in Your Research Work:

Not knowing your topic “Evaluation Of The Junior Secondary School’s Predictive Value In Relation To The Senior Secondary School’s Examination Performance” inside out will cause you to struggle and ultimately fail with your defense. You need to know the subject from every angle to ensure you are fully prepared for any question that may come your way.

4. Conclusion:

Reinforce your findings to conclude your defense. The finale of your presentation should focus on proving the work that has been done. You may need to recap on what has changed and remained unchanged, if is necessary.

5 . Listen:

Before you get defensive or recite a particular answer, make sure you truly understand the question being asked. Being a good listener is an important quality, because providing an inaccurate or off-topic answer will also weaken the validity of your paper.


Frequently Asked Questions


Is there an overload of summative assessment in secondary schools?

As there is perceived to be an overload of summative assessment in secondary schools, particularly in the form of written examinations, there is now a need to look more urgently to the development of a national standards framework to support teachers’ work in summative assessment.

What has changed in the external school evaluation system?

Since the enactment of the Education Act in 1998, the external school evaluation system has developed considerably with the introduction of a broader range of inspection models at primary and secondary levels (Inspectorate, 2006a; Inspectorate, 2010a).

What are the assessment approaches recommended for secondary schools?

The assessment approaches recommended for secondary schools include formal methods, informal methods, and diagnostic methods (Inspectorate, Department of Education and Science, 2007c). Formal methods of assessment include standardised, criterion-referenced and certain diagnostic tests.

How effective is system evaluation in improving education?

There is emerging evidence that the current arrangements for system evaluation have been effective in relation to informing aspects of policy development and resource allocation, improving student participation and to a lesser extent in improving student achievement. 

Samphina Academy

Samphina Academy is an Online Educational Resource Center that is aimed at providing students with quality information and materials to aid them in succeeding in their academic pursuit.