Effect Of Processing On The Storage Stability And Functional Properties Of Cowpea Flour In The Production Of Moin-Moin And Akara

Project and Seminar Material for Food Science and Technology (FST)

Effect Of Processing On The Storage Stability And Functional Properties Of Cowpea Flour In The Production Of Moin-Moin And Akara


Abstract


Flours prepared from cowpea variety white using different processing methods (germination, heat treatment, fermentation and the untreated flour) were evaluated for proximate composition, functional, sensory properties and storage stability. The fermented and germinated samples were found to be richer in carbohydrate content with 59.72% and 57.78% respectively while the untreated flour had the highest protein content (27.87%).

The untreated flour also compared favorably with the control (wet processed paste) in terms of organoleptic properties in the production of akara and moin-moin. For storage, after three months, the germinated cowpea flour was found to be more stable in terms of reduction in moisture with 10.2%, followed by fermented and untreated flour and then heat treated flour with 10.6%, 10.6% and 10.8% respectively. The fermented flour sample resulted in a high free fatty acid (0.84%) which is liable to rancidity and off flavour, followed by germinated flour (0.40%). The heat treated and untreated cowpea flour proved to be more stable with a free fatty acid content of 0.23% each.


Chapter One


Introduction

1.1 Background of the Study

Vigna unguiculata, a legume commonly known as cowpea, is an important dietary staple in many developing nations because of its high nutritional value, low cost and availability (Boeh‐Ocansey 1989; Uzogara and Ofuya 1992; Prinyawiwatkul et al. 1996). Cowpeas are approximately 24% protein (with an amino acid content complementary to that found in cereals), 60% carbohydrates, are a good source of dietary fiber, and contain numerous vitamins and minerals (Bressani 1985; Phillips and McWatters 1991; Phillips 1993).

Akara is a traditional African product prepared by deep frying cowpea paste that has been whipped and seasoned with salt, chopped onions and either hot or bell peppers. The outer crust of akara is crisp and the interior is spongy and bread‐like. Akara is considered to be the most commonly consumed cowpea‐derived food in West Africa, and is made by individuals at home and sold fully prepared by vendors in marketplaces (Dovlo et al. 1976; Phillips and McWatters 1991). The traditional process for making akara is very time‐consuming and labor‐intensive, and requires the cowpeas be soaked, manually decorticated and wet‐milled. Microbial spoilage necessitates that the paste be used within several hours or be discarded, preventing the preparation of large amounts of paste that can be whipped and fried in small batches throughout the day (Bulgarelli et al. 1988).

To simplify akara preparation, easy‐to‐use readily hydratable cowpea meals and flours have been developed; however, akara prepared from commercially available meals and flours lacked the typical and desired fresh cowpea flavor and had a dense, dry texture disliked by consumers (Dovlo et al. 1976; McWatters 1983). An amalgam of growing, storage and processing conditions influence the functional properties of legume components ultimately determining the viability of a meal or flour as a starting material for akara (Phillips and McWatters 1991; Kaur and Singh 2005).

Past studies have been conducted with the aim of improving the functionality of cowpea meal and flour. Based on data from these past studies, it can be concluded that there are three keys to making acceptable akara from a processed meal or flour: (1) cowpea proteins must maintain their structure in order to be functional; (2) particle size distribution (PSD) of meal or flour must consist of at least 65% particles that fall in the medium size range, i.e., between 0.180 and 0.425 mm; and (3) chunks of cell wall matrix must be present after processing (McWatters 1983, Ngoddy et al. 1986; Abbey and Ibeh 1988; Phillips et al. 1988; Henshaw et al. 1996; Enwere et al. 1998; Kethireddipalli et al. 2002a,b; Singh et al. 2004). Although each of these factors is known to be core and it is assumed that they are confounding, the degree of importance of each factor is not well understood.

The hydration characteristics of the starting material, resulting flow characteristics and foaming of the paste influence the final appearance and texture (and hence the acceptability) of akara (McWatters and Brantley 1982). A starting material with a low level of hydration resulted in a dry dense product with a tough outer crust (McWatters 1983). Several researchers observed decreases in the functionality of plant fibers (i.e., water holding capacity) with decreasing particle size upon milling of plant material, and attributed this to the alteration of fiber structure and loss of the cell wall matrix as a result of shearing of the plant cells (Mongeau and Brassard 1982; Cadden 1987; Han and Khan 1990a,b; Auffret et al. 1994).

Although dry milling is preferable to wet milling because of economic and food safety issues (Phillips and McWatters 1991), the question of how to produce akara that matches the quality of product prepared from traditionally wet‐milled (WTM) peas using a dry‐milled starting material has been a challenge to researchers.

Microscopic examination of hydrated cellular material from wet‐milled cowpea paste and pastes produced from dry‐milled cowpea meal and flour showed a difference in the amount of cell wall material (CWM) present and the condition of the CWM found (Kethireddipalli et al. 2002b). The researchers observed a significant amount of cell wall matrix forming networks in the WTM material, whereas cellular material from meal paste consisted of many intact cells. Finely milled flour also contained a significant amount of CWM; however, it lacked a network because of fine fragmentation during milling. The authors speculated that the wet milling of the cowpeas allowed for facile release of cell contents, including CWM, by easy rupture of turgid cells. The authors attributed the improved hydration and foaming characteristics and the superior texture of the akara made from the wet‐milled paste to the presence of the light and fluffy cell wall matrix.

For this study, it was decided to use a wet milling process to produce a cowpea paste, which was then freeze‐dried and ground into a meal to be compared with a dry‐milled meal and traditionally prepared cowpea paste. Initial quality tests indicated that control of thermal abuse and milling method alone did not ensure good functionality and thus, a high‐quality akara. Therefore, the freeze‐dried and hammer‐milled meals were fractionated by sieving with the particles recombined in order to control for PSD. Hence, the study was to identify the effect of processing on the storage stability and functional properties of cowpea flour in the production of moin-moin and akara.


1.2 Statement of the Problem

Cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata) are an important source of protein in developing countries especially in Nigeria. It is an example of grain legume which has found utilization in various ways in traditional and modern food processing in the world (Odedeji and Oyeleke, 2011). In countries such as Nigeria, and most of the sub-Sahara countries, animal products representing high concentration and quality of protein are either too expensive or simply unaffordable, thus increasing the dependence on cereal grains, roots and tuber crops. In Nigeria, cowpea is consumed in the form of bean pudding, bean cake, baked bean, fried bean, and bean soup amongst others. According to IITA (2009), cowpea grain contains about 25 % protein, and several vitamins and minerals. Most tropical countries are faced with Protein-Energy Malnutrition (PEM) as a result of increasing population and enhanced dependence on cereal and tuber based diet. It is estimated that about 800 million malnourished people exist in some of the least developed countries, mostly in sub-Sahara Africa.

Cereal and legume are known to complement each other when consumed together so as to provide adequate nutrients for the improvement of the nutritional well-being of the people (Chikwendu, 2007). Cowpea and maize, in spite of their great nutritional and economic importance are highly susceptible to many diseases and pests right from growing stage up to storage (Singh et al., 1997) and final consumption. Therefore, there is need to reduce post-harvest losses of these valuable grains via processing them into flour. There is limited information on the effect of processing on the storage stability and functional properties of cowpea flour in the production of moin-moin and akara, hence, the need to go into such research.


1.3 Objectives of the Study

The main objective of this study is to identify the effect of processing on the storage stability and functional properties of cowpea flour in the production of moin-moin and akara.

The specific objectives include;

  1. To evaluate moin-moin samples from bambara and cowpea as functional properties of cowpea flour
  2. To determine the production process of breadfruit flour using cowpea flour.
  3. To find out basic Ingredients in ‘Moin-moin’ Preparation and Quality

1.4 Research Questions

  1. What are moin-moin samples from bambara and cowpea as functional properties of cowpea flour?
  2. What is the production process of breadfruit flour using cowpea flour?
  3. What are the basic Ingredients in ‘Moin-moin’ Preparation and Quality?

1.5 Significance of the Study

This study will be of immense benefit to other researchers who intend to know more on this study and can also be used by non-researchers to build more on their research work. This study contributes to knowledge and could serve as a guide for other study.


1.7 Scope of the Study

This study is on the effect of processing on the storage stability and functional properties of cowpea flour in the production of moin-moin and ankara.


1.8 Limitations of the study

The demanding schedule of respondents at work made it very difficult getting the respondents to participate in the survey. The researcher is a student and therefore has limited time as well as resources in covering extensive literature available in conducting this research. Information provided by the researcher may not hold true for all businesses or organizations but is restricted to the selected organization used as a study in this research especially in the locality where this study is being conducted.

  1. Financial constraint: Insufficient fund tends to impede the efficiency of the researcher in sourcing for the relevant materials, literature or information and in the process of data collection (internet, questionnaire and interview).
  2. Time constraint: The researcher will simultaneously engage in this study with other academic work. This consequently will cut down on the time devoted for the research work.
  3. Finally, the researcher is restricted only to the evidence provided by the participants in the research and therefore cannot determine the reliability and accuracy of the information provided.

1.9 Definition of Terms

Cowpea:

Sprawling herb (Vigna unguiculata synonym V. sinensis) of the legume family related to the bean and widely cultivated in the southern U.S. for forage, green manure, and edible seeds also : its edible seed. — called also black-eyed pea, field pea.

Stability:

The quality, state, or degree of being stable: such as. a : the strength to stand or endure : firmness. b : the property of a body that causes it when disturbed from a condition of equilibrium or steady motion to develop forces or moments that restore the original condition.

Functional Properties:

Functional properties describes how ingredients behave during preparation and cooking, how they affect the finished food product in terms of how it looks, tastes.

Storage:

The state of being kept in a place when not being used : the state of being stored somewhere. : the act of putting something that is not being used in a place where it is available, where it can be kept safely, etc. : the act of storing something.

Moin-moin:

Moimoi is a Nigerian steamed bean pudding made from a mixture of washed and peeled black-eyed beans, onions and fresh ground red peppers

Akara:

Akara (Nigeria) bean cake, fried black-eyed pea flour quotations: Àkàrà is a generic word meaning “bread” or “pastry”, or the dish itself


Chapter Five


Summary, Conclusion and Recommendations

5.1 Summary of Findings

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of processing on the storage stability and functional properties of cowpea flour in the production of moin-moin and akara.

The objectives of the study were to;

  1. To evaluate moin-moin samples from bambara and cowpea as functional properties of cowpea flour
  2. To determine the production process of breadfruit flour using cowpea flour.
  3. To find out basic Ingredients in ‘Moin-moin’ Preparation and Quality

5.3 Discussion of Findings

During data analysis, the student t-test analysis was employed.

Findings from the study revealed that majority of the respondents were of the opinion that is base on the research questions as;

  1. What are moin-moin samples from bambara and cowpea as functional properties of cowpea flour?
  2. What is the production process of breadfruit flour using cowpea flour?
  3. What are the basic Ingredients in ‘Moin-moin’ Preparation and Quality?

Therefore the null hypothesis is rejected.


5.2 Conclusion

Several data trends were observed in the result of the proximate composition of the flour blends. The moisture content of the flour blends was much higher than the value obtained for 100% maize flour. The sample with 10% cowpea substitution has the least value while the sample with 30% cowpea substitution has the highest moisture content, the values were observed to increase with increase in cowpea enrichment which implies that cowpea substitution enhanced water absorption in the sample. Similar observation was made by Barber et al. (2010). Protein content increased as a result of cowpea substitution in the flour blends, the values were significantly different among the samples. The values of fat content obtained for the flour blends were not significantly different among the flour blends but these values were significantly different.

This study has shown that increasing the percentage of cowpea flour in maize and cowpea flour blends improved the protein and mineral contents of the maize; this indicates a higher nutrient value with respect to protein and mineral contents. The functional properties (water and oil absorption, foaming capacity, emulsion capacity and stability) of the maize flour were also enhanced with the addition of cowpea as the blends had higher values compared to 100% maize flour. Microbiological qualities were not significantly affected by cowpea enrichment. Conclusively, cowpea can be added to maize to produce a composite flour of high nutritive and enhanced functional properties.


5.3 Recommendations

A-short-cooking time cowpea flour for „moin-moin‟ preparation was successfully produced. Nutritionally, though the product came out less than the control, the amino acids profile and the essential amino acids index suggested that its protein has moderate nutritive value. Convenience and time-saving are two-in-one unbeatable combination presented by this product. A product with such attributes would enhance domestic utilization of cowpea, hence increase in household levels and improved nutritional status.


Effect Of Processing On The Storage Stability And Functional Properties Of Cowpea Flour In The Production Of Moin-Moin And Akara


Project Material Download

3,000 Naira


The complete material will be sent to you in just 2 steps.

Quick & Simple…


Step One Purchase

Make payment of ₦3,000: through USSD Transfer, Bank Mobile App, ATM Transfer, or POS Transfer to:

Access Bank PlcAccount No.: 0811003731
Name: Samphina Academy
Account Type: Current

Or Click Here to pay with Debit Card

FOR CLIENTS OUTSIDE NIGERIA:
Click Here to pay with Debit Card ($15)
GHANA – Make Payment of 60 GHS to MTN MoMo, 0553978005, Douglas Osabutey 

  PAY WITH CRYPTOCURRENCY


Step Two Purchase

Send the following details through Text Message or WhatsApp Messenger | +234-8143831497

  • Payment Details 
  • Email Address 
  • Effect Of Processing On The Storage Stability And Functional Properties Of Cowpea Flour In The Production Of Moin-Moin And Akara

The complete material will be sent to your email address after receiving your payment information | T & C Apply


  Contact Our Help Desk


You may also like:

⚠️ Need a different topic? Perform a quick search



Get A Complete Business Plan For Any Business In Nigeria

Business Plan for Businesses in Nigeria

  Business Plans in Nigeria


Effect Of Processing On The Storage Stability And Functional Properties Of Cowpea Flour In The Production Of Moin-Moin And Akara


Disclaimer

This research material “Effect Of Processing On The Storage Stability And Functional Properties Of Cowpea Flour In The Production Of Moin-Moin And Akara” is for research purposes and should be used as a guide in developing your research project / seminar work. For no reason should you copy word for word (verbatim) as samphina.com.ng will not be liable for any who copied the material.

The aim of providing this material is to reduce the stress of moving from one school library to another all in the name of searching for research materials. This service is legal because, all institutions permit their students to read previous projects, books, articles or papers while developing their own works. According to Austin Kleon “All creative work builds on what came before”.

samphina.com.ng is only providing this material “Effect Of Processing On The Storage Stability And Functional Properties Of Cowpea Flour In The Production Of Moin-Moin And Akara” as a reference for your research. The paper should be used as a guide or framework for your own paper. The contents of this paper should be able to help you in generating new ideas and thoughts for your own research. Use it as a guidance purpose only.


How to defend your research work


This is a general guide on how to defend your research work:

1. Prepare For Questions:

If you are preparing for questions that may be asked during your defense, then your answers will flow smoothly and effectively. This will prove your knowledge on the subject e.g “Effect Of Processing On The Storage Stability And Functional Properties Of Cowpea Flour In The Production Of Moin-Moin And Akara“, and strengthening your argument. Ask friends and family, read your work for them to listen to your presentation, and write down questions. You may be lucky the panel will ask you those you have already prepared on.

2. Strong Summary:

Summarizing your chapters will help keep your audience focused because it is easy for a mind to drift, so providing summaries will ensure your panel will follow along, even if they lose focus for a brief moment. Visual aides, such as graphs and power-point presentations can be very helpful. If you are going to use these, make sure you will practice your presentation with them.

3. Be Confident in Your Research Work:

Not knowing your topic “Effect Of Processing On The Storage Stability And Functional Properties Of Cowpea Flour In The Production Of Moin-Moin And Akara” inside out will cause you to struggle and ultimately fail with your defense. You need to know the subject from every angle to ensure you are fully prepared for any question that may come your way.

4. Conclusion:

Reinforce your findings to conclude your defense. The finale of your presentation should focus on proving the work that has been done. You may need to recap on what has changed and remained unchanged, if is necessary.

5 . Listen:

Before you get defensive or recite a particular answer, make sure you truly understand the question being asked. Being a good listener is an important quality, because providing an inaccurate or off-topic answer will also weaken the validity of your paper.

Samphina Academy

Samphina Academy is an Online Educational Resource Center that is aimed at providing students with quality information and materials to aid them in succeeding in their academic pursuit.